Category: China

The Litten and the Tiger: Chinese Folklore and Pokemon

The Litten and the Tiger: Chinese Folklore and Pokemon

The new Pokemon starts for Sun and Moon were announced a week ago. Aside from Rowlet, the round little owl which is obviously the best, the fire type Litten and the water type Popplio were also introduced. Litten bears a distinctive mark on his forehead, a mark that is influenced by Chinese folklore and the position of the tiger in Chinese culture.

Litten, one of the Sun and Moon starter Pokemon.

In Chinese mythology and folklore, the tiger is considered the king of beasts. To represent this, stylized images of the tiger are often depicted with the character 王 (wáng) on the forehead, with 王 meaning “king” in Chinese. The the stripes on the foreheads of real tigers are thought to also evoke the character 王. Due to kanji being derived from Chinese characters, 王 holds the same meaning in Japanese. As the fictional word of Pokemon is one apart from our own, placing 王 on Litten would be too much of a fourth-wall breaker, unduly challenging Pokemon’s own internal mythology. However, the altered marking serves the same purpose, as audiences aware of the the connotation will find the connection to the tiger and the symbolism of 王 readily apparent.

Joker Game: The International Settlement and Indian Soldiers in Shanghai

Joker Game: The International Settlement and Indian Soldiers in Shanghai

As a work of historical fiction, Joker Game draws upon the reality of pre-war East Asia to frame its tale of espionage in a world on brink of war. The investigation of a bombing at the beginning of episode 4 shows the complex state of affairs that existed in 1937 Shanghai, a mirror of the international entanglements that would draw the entire world into conflict.

The site of the bombing is located in the Shanghai International Settlement. The International Settlement was a segregated section in Shanghai where many foreign citizens resided and a version of this area can be seen in the Spielberg film Empire of the Sun. In the late 1930s China was nominally an independent country, yet not completely in total control of all of its own territory. Although not a colonized nation, nor under the full dominion of an imperial power, a series of unequal treaties and concessions to foreign governments gave foreigners extraordinary rights and privileges. After Shanghai had been ceded as an open treaty port in the aftermath of China’s defeat in the First Opium War, Britain, the United States and France established settlements in the city. Forcing the defeated Qing government of China to agree to special terms, these settlements were ruled outside of Chinese jurisdiction. The British and American settlements eventually merged and other nations including Japan eventually joined what became known as the International Settlement. The international element of the settlement is evidenced by the number of flags in the center of the banner of the Shanghai Municipal Council, the Settlement’s ruling body.

An old quip about the kind of people who go to China labels them as missionaries, misfits and mercenaries. Although nations had fought the Opium War, most of the residents in China were businessmen and clergymen, with vested interests that did not always coincide with those of their governments. To avoid undue interference, the International Settlement quickly moved to set up its own government early in its existence. By 1937 it was a self governing enclave apart from China with its own military and police force, the majority of which were provided by the British government. The arrangement was not problematic, as it gave each side something out of the deal. The nature of the Settlement’s governance and status as a ceded territory explains why the bombing was being investigated by a British Inspector with Indian policemen.

With East Asia in turmoil, this international state of affairs was not to last. Japan entered into a state of war with China in 1937  Japanese forces attacked and captured Shanghai in August of that year.  It is somewhat unclear as to the date in episode 4 but given the relatively upbeat mood of the city, it is likely before the the Japanese invasion. However, dialogue does mention Nationalist Chinese bombings, so it is probably after the war began in July 1937. As tensions mounted between Japan and other powers in the region, the British withdrew the bulk of their forces in 1940. The end of the International Settlement came after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Knowing that a state of war between Japan and the US as well as other nations was imminent, Japanese solders entered the International Settlement and took control. Foreigners were sent to the Lunghua Civilian Assembly Center to be interned for the duration of the war. (Author’s note: I spent some time at the former site of the Lunghua Center. It is now a high school campus. Very little evidence of the original internment center survives, as the old blockhouses have been demolished and the few articles about the era that once existed have been removed from the school’s museum.)

In 1937 Britain had not yet descended into the twilight of empire, although there were visible and irreparable strains at the seams of imperial control. London still presided over a colonial empire over which many had famously claimed the sun never set. India had been under the direct control of the crown since the Indian Rebellion of 1857. As part of the British Empire, Indians were inducted into service in the British Indian Army. Due to its proximity to East Asia, India provided a means to deploy large numbers of troops rapidly to areas far from the metropole of Britain. Indian soldiers were used in China during the Boxer Uprising and in various theaters in both World War I and World War II. As the majority of foreign troops in Shanghai were provided by the British military, Indians formed a large part of the International Settlement’s Municipal Police and the Shanghai Defense Force.

The style of turbans worn by the Indians soldiers in the scene identify them as Sikh. After the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the British turned to primarily recruit soldiers from what they deemed to be the “martial races.” This race-based ideology stated that people of “martial races” were well suited to be soldiers due to innate bravery and fighting ability. Sikhs were among the groups the British considered “martial races” and were thus recruited heavily.

After World War II, the British hold on India was untenable as internal and external pressures mounted. In India pro-independence sentiments could no longer be contained. At home, Britain lacked the will to continue to hold on to its empire and had begun to turn inwards towards the development of the Welfare State The days of the Raj–the name for the British rule of India–were numbered. Britain quickly began the process of relinquishing control and in 1947 the old British Raj became the new nations of India and Pakistan.

References

  • The British Indian Army 1860–1914 by Peter Duckers
  • Empire Made Me: An Englishman Adrift in Shanghai by Robert Bickers
  • “‘Punjabization’ in the British Indian Army 1857 – 1947 and the Advent of Military Rule in Pakistan” by Syed Hussain Shaheed Soherwordi
  • Turbans of the Indian Army – http://www.militarysunhelmets.com/2013/turbans-of-the-indian-army
  • “Origin and Development of the Political System in the Shanghai International Settlement” by J.H. Haan
Photo of the Day: The Taiping Rebellion

Photo of the Day: The Taiping Rebellion

Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Street Graffiti

The name of the 太平天囯 (Taiping Tianguo), the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom is invoked on a street sign on Salisbury Road in Hong Kong. The Taiping were a rebel faction led by Hong Xiuquan who carved out a nation in southern China from 1851 to 1864. At odds with the ruling Qing Dynasty, the so called Taiping Rebellion was the costliest civil war in history, with some estimates placing the death toll at 25 million.

Photo of the Day: The National Palace Museum

Photo of the Day: The National Palace Museum

The National Palace Museum in Taiwain

In the 1930s Chinese Nationalist authorities removed the the bulk of the collection of art and antiquities located within the Palace Museum inside the Forbidden City to prevent them from falling into Japanese hands as hostilities and tensions began to escalate between China and Japan after the Mukden Bridge Incident. In 1948 the decision was made to take the best of the collection to Taiwan as the Civil War between the Nationalists under Chiang Kai-Shek and the Chinese Communists under Mao Zedong continued. Ultimately, over 600000 pieces of the finest examples of Chinese art and artifacts including books and paintings were sent to Taiwan and with the Nationalist retreat to the island in 1949, the collection would come to be housed in the National Palace Museum. As a result, the museum is widely considered to house the best examples of Chinese art in the world.

Photo of the Day: The Shanghai World Expo

Photo of the Day: The Shanghai World Expo

Crowds form beneath the illuminated Expo Axis structure not far from the China Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai World Expo. Photo taken on October 16 2010, which set the record for the highest one-day attendance in world expo history with 1.03 million visitors. Naturally, that was the day your intrepid Wired History crew decided on for our third foray to the Expo grounds.

Photo of the Day: The 9:18 History Museum

Photo of the Day: The 9:18 History Museum

A massive sculpture at the 9:18 Museum

The 9:18 Museum in Shenyang is devoted to the Mukden Bridge Incident. On September 9th 1931 Japanese troops detonated explosives near a Japanese controlled railroad line in a “false flag” operation in order to blame Chinese agitators for the act. With the explosion as a pretext, Japan launched an invasion of Manchuria resulting in the formation of the puppet state of Manchukuo. The museum itself sits upon the exact spot of the explosion.

Photo taken in Shenyang on 6/5/2011.